Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/3647
Title: The Double oppression of algerian women during the black decade and black american women during the 20th centry a special reference to Rachid Boudjadra's The funerals and Maya Angelou's I know why the caged bird sings
Authors: Nasli, Nardjess
Hafsa, Naima
Keywords: Novel : Rachid Boudjedra : The funerals
Novel : Maya Angelou : I know why the caged bird sings
Issue Date: 2016
Publisher: university of Oum-El-Bouaghi
Abstract: This study delineates the double oppression of algerian women during the black decade and the black american women during the twentieth century The Funerals by Rachid Boudjadra and I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings by Maya Angelou. It furthers this investigation into linking the novels to The funerals and I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings to the Algerian black decade and the twentieth century, locating them among the successful and epitomizing works of the two periods. the works have been merely studied from their main themes racism and terrorism. However, this study delves into the deep meaning of those works, allowing more theories and methods to be experimented. Its main theoretical framework will be drawn on feminism and empowerment. It aims to explore the double oppression of Algerian and black American women, as well as, to show how the oppressed women can improve themselves to be powerful women. This study finds that the novels discover the double oppression of Algerian women, during the Black Decade, and the black American women, during the twentieth century. Furthermore, it analysis the path that the oppressed women should go through to overcome their oppression. The Funerals and I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings perfectly represent the Algerian women during the Black Decade and the black American women during the twentieth century.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/3647
Appears in Collections:قسم اللغة الإنجليزية

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